Home Lifestyle The most sexually curious location in the UK revealed

The most sexually curious location in the UK revealed

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Which city is the UK’s most sexually curious? (Picture: Getty Images/Science Photo Libra)

When it comes to sex education in schools, you might think of a situation involving a mumbling teacher and a demonstration with a banana.

There might’ve been fleeting, blushing looks over at a crush, or sniggers among the cool kids who were apparently already well-versed sex experts.

Where sex education has failed us (a shocking 26% of students have said that they didn’t receive any SRE in school at all), the internet, for better or for worse, has often plugged the gap.

Curious Brits have turned to Google to ask their burning sex questions – and now new data has worked out just where most of those queries are coming from.

In a ranking of the most sexually curious locations in the UK, top of the list is Swansea.

The south Wales city is relatively small, just shy of 250,000, but it underwent a staggering 111 searches per 100,000 residents which, according to the study’s authors, signified a need for ‘accessible sexual health resources’ in the region.



The most sexually curious cities in the UK, according to Oxford Online Pharmacy

  1. Swansea – 111 searches per 100,000
  2. Milton Keynes – 63
  3. Gloucester – 57
  4. Brighton – 57
  5. Huddersfield – 52
  6. Dundee – 47
  7. Telford – 44
  8. Southend-on-Sea – 43
  9. York – 39
  10. Ipswich – 38.

Close behind in second place was Milton Keynes in Buckinghamshire. Despite the efforts of the local council to provide information on sexual health through services like iCaSH, a network of sexual health services, it’s clear its residents need more help.

Inthird and fourth place was Gloucester and, perhaps surprisingly, the coastal, liberal metropolis of Brighton.



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The authors of the study conducted by Oxford Online Pharmacy concluded that Gloucester’s rise in ‘internet-based puberty education’ suggested ‘a growing reliance on digital resources among the younger generation.’

As for Brighton, colloquially regarded as the LGBTQ+ capital of the UK, its sexual curiosity suggested a ‘paradoxical reluctance to seek face-to-face support for intimate inquiries.’

And what exactly are we asking Google? Well, the reigning themes seemed to centre around erections and lasting longer in bed. ‘How to last longer in bed’ received the highest number of monthly searches at 12,100.

Female pleasure was also a point of interest, as ‘how to make a woman orgasm’ gathered 1,900 monthly searches.

Swansea is the most sexually curious city in the UK (Picture: Metro.co.uk / Created with Datawrapper)

Why are we still afraid to ask experts about sex?

According to sex and relationship therapist Rhian Kivits, people often want ‘instant answers’ that only the internet can provide.

‘Sex and sexual-health related issues often feel like pressing problems and people often don’t want to wait for an appointment with a GP or sexual health expert as they are likely to ruminate on the problems until they receive answers,’ Rhian tells Metro.co.uk.

Of course, there’s also the embarrassment factor.

‘People may not feel comfortable talking to friends or family about these issues and therefore using Google means that they can seek out information privately, without the perceived shame or embarrassment of admitting that they have a problem.’

But it’s always worth bearing in mind that the internet is full if misinformation which can be hard to identify.

‘There is no guarantee that everything we find online is 100% accurate. Issues related to sex and sexual health can be complex and diagnoses and solutions are not necessarily the same in every case,’ Rhian explains.

So, when seeking information on sexual health, Rhian reminds us that it’s okay to request a specific GP if you’d prefer to speak to someone who is the same gender and ease some anxiety.

‘Know that GPs are used to talking about sexual health related matters and therefore your problem won’t be shocking or strange to them,’ Rhian concludes.

‘And remember that you have the right to make choices about your treatment as it’s your body.’

Do you have a story to share?

Get in touch by emailing [email protected].


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